Priscilla: Opposition bosses mentally ill

MDC MP for Umzingwane, Priscilla Misihairabwi-Mushonga said the chaos happening in the opposition circles was a sign of mental illness affecting her colleagues.

The sole Welshman Ncube led MDC legislator said failure by opposition leaders to form a single coalition against Zanu PF ahead of the forth coming election shows their inability to critically think and act accordingly.

So far, there are three coalitions of opposition political parties which have been formed to contest against Zanu PF in 2018.

The three are  the Morgan Tsvangirai led MDC Alliance, People’s Rainbow led by Joice Mujuru and the Coalition of Democrats which is being fronted by Elton Mangoma.

Speaking at a political dialogue organized Ibbo Mandaza’s Southern African Political Economy Series in Harare on Thursday, Misihairabwi-Mushonga said she might be the only opposition politician who is sober.

“I know my colleagues in the opposition will be upset, I have told them that I believe I am very lucky which is why I probably still make a bit of sense-not too much sense but a bit of it-because when I realized that I was unwell due to clinical depression I sought help,” she said.

“Most of my colleagues have not and I seriously believe that they need to seek help, because until people can go back to a point where they can think through things  properly we will continue to have the nonsense that is currently happening in the opposition,” said Misihairabwi-Mushonga.

“And I do not think that they know that what they are doing is nonsensical because I think that they are unwell  and therefore they cannot focus and they cannot think and mental illness is not something to laugh about because it messes your whole thinking process  and therefore no one is energized enough to mentally think properly,” she said.

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Misihairabwi-Mushonga is one of the few female MPs who have not only been making fierce contributions in parliament but also challenged the patriarchy in the country’s opposition political set up.